Newsletter Marketing Tricks That Turn Profits

Creating a better newsletter means engaging your customers, imbuing them with a sense of solidarity, and finding opportunities to boost profits from your content.  The best way to learn to print and mail a great newsletter is to read other great newsletters.  I came across Issue No. 66 of the Wilson Creek Winery & Vineyards Wine Club newsletter and thought it would make a great example of newsletter marketing best practices.  Let’s go through it, page by page.

Front Cover:  Get Attention

Attention-getting design:  A real photo of the vineyard, branded nameplate, and a sense of pride from the Abraham Lincoln quote and the American flag.  The cover sets the theme and tone.

Issue_66_201206_201207-1.pdf - Adobe Reader_2012-06-12_12-38-13

Page 2:  The Personal Touch

The winery’s owner or founder (I’m not sure whioh) offers a personal note, which makes the experience more personal for customers as well.  The company’s charity work is highlighted at the bottom, demonstrating that it is run by good people.

Issue_66_201206_201207-1.pdf - Adobe Reader_2012-06-12_12-41-40

Page 3:  Highlighted Events

The winery has a lot of events, which undoubtedly brings customers in to make purchases.  Photos depict customers having a great time at these events, lending a sense of community and brand loyalty.

Issue_66_201206_201207-1.pdf - Adobe Reader_2012-06-12_12-46-04

Page 4:  How It’s Made and Product Pitch

The newsletter’s “Winemaker’s Corner” section offers insight into the inner workings of the vineyard, establish a sense of authenticity and lending credibility to the wine.  Wine enthusiasts want to know more about how their wine is made, when it is made, and who made it.  This page also presents a couple of product pitches that are in line with the article content, which can help create customer desire and motivate fast purchases.

Issue_66_201206_201207-1.pdf - Adobe Reader_2012-06-12_12-48-17

Page 5:  The Full Customer Experience

The winery furthers its mission for community and customer experience with a page that offers fun and engaging information such as how wine feels (along with a great visual chart), photos of customers playing a game at the winery, and with a promotion for the winery as a wedding venue.

Issue_66_201206_201207-1.pdf - Adobe Reader_2012-06-12_12-52-23

Page 6: Enhanced Experience

A recipe and suggested wine pairing help customers full immerse themselves in the culture, while the freebie section encourages customers to keep coming back.  An event pitch is snuck in at the top, along with a fun photo that commands attention, and the winery shows its appreciation by showcasing one of its best customers.  Customers love to read about themselves, and people like them. This strategy ensures they’ll look forward to receiving – and actually reading – their newsletters.

Issue_66_201206_201207-1.pdf - Adobe Reader_2012-06-12_12-52-53

Page 7:  All About The Customer

This layout is loaded with customer showcases, and they all just happen to have great things to say about the winery.  Real photos are used.  They’re not staged, and the testimonials sound honest.  When done right, such a page lends credibility and keeps customers engaged.  Those who are featured are likely to share the newsletter with their friends and family, exposing them to the winery and ultimately leading to more sales.  A pitch for a Facebook “like” is placed at the bottom of the page, in line with the page’s content and helping to solidify the community.

Issue_66_201206_201207-1.pdf - Adobe Reader_2012-06-12_12-53-09

Page 8:  The Product Pitch

The last page of the newsletter reveals current featured wines, selected for wine club members.  This strategy helps customers feel like VIPs with a community of like-minded individuals who share tastes in wine and culture.  I have no doubt the recommended wines are excellent.  The winery isn’t just trying to make a profit today, it’s trying to establish its credibility.  When customers trust its recommendations and are rewarded with a product they love, the winery will earn an excellent reputation.  After the featured wines list is the sales pitch:  a discount sale with a clearly-defined call to action.  Even though a few products were highlighted in the rest of the newsletter, the winery waits until the end to drop its big deal.  Why?  Because a newsletter should feel like a newsletter, not a sales pitch, and customers should enjoy reading it.  By the time they get to this part, they’re already sold and don’t mind the discount offer one bit.

Issue_66_201206_201207-1.pdf - Adobe Reader_2012-06-12_12-53-33

Want a better newsletter?  Make yours more like the Wilson Creek Winery & Vineyards Wine Club newsletter, and you’ll build a fiercely loyal customer base while boosting profits.

About the Author:

Brian Morris serves in various capacities as a freelance writer, content developer and public relations specialist for growing small businesses. His previous roles included managing editor for a hometown newspaper and club bartender for a group of quasi-alcoholics. When he’s not writing, he’s usually counting lost follicles and wondering what he ever did with his time before his two children were born.

, ,