7 Ways to Boost Summer Profits

summer-sales

Looking to boost your business profits this summer?  The following summer marketing strategies will put you on the right track!

1.  Raise prices

I’ve written about this before, and it’s one of the best and easiest ways you can make more money.  Few, if any, markets are completely price-driven.  Factors such as brand image and quality – buying on emotion, justifying with logic – influence purchase decisions more than price.  If you’re a freelance graphic designer, for example, you’re better off charging more and working with fewer clients.  You’ll work less for better pay.  Who doesn’t want to do that?

2.  Sell your benefits

If you’re going to raise prices, you have to tell customers what’s in it for them.  I’ve often read that if you’re going to ask for a raise at work, you can’t simply tell employers all you’ve already done for them.  After all, you’re only pointing out what you’re willing to do at your current salary.  Instead, you highlight what else you can do in return for the raise.  This creates a clear benefit, and one that is usually worth paying for.  The same is true of business sales:  If you want customers to buy, you have to show them how you’ll make their lives better.

3.  Delegate

No one person can do it all, at least not with the utmost efficiency.  Focus on what you do best, and delegate the rest.  You can hire a part-time bookkeeper for a few hours a week, pay them half your hourly fee, and make up the difference by working on making money, not managing your books.

4.  Launch a brand awareness campaign

Brand value is important to customers, but when was the last (or even first) time you launched a campaign to increase awareness of your brand?  If you’re a small business, I’m guessing you’ve never done this.  No matter how narrow your market, how local your services, or how small your company, a good brand awareness campaign can boost your sales exponentially.

The best part is that you can launch a brand awareness campaign for dirt cheap.  Print posters, flyers, and vinyl banners to distribute in both high-traffic areas as well as areas your customer base frequents.  This act alone can make hundreds and even thousands of potential customers aware of your brand.  For a more comprehensive campaign, consider door hanger or postcard printing and mailing.  You don’t always have to have a special offer to benefit from marketing.

5.  Get involved in your community

Community involvement means everything from volunteering to collect food cans to joining a civic organization to renting a booth at the local summer festival.  In every case, wear a shirt that promotes your brand and have plenty of business cards on-hand to give out to new contacts.  If you’re renting a festival booth, draw crowds with a large-format vinyl banner, give an entertaining presentation, and print takeaways such as magnets and notepads to help customers remember to follow up with you.

6.  Go social on site

Social media sites such as Yelp, Facebook, and countless others can help you grow your business by engaging customers.  Use QR codes and other tools to interact with customers right from your posters and flyers, or at your retail location.  You might, for example, enter customers into a drawing for becoming a Facebook fan, which they can do right from their phones by scanning your QR code at your location.

7.  Try something new

Have you tried postcard marketing?  Booklet marketing?  Social media?  AdWords?  Rack cards or table tents?  How about stickers?  Too often small businesses get in the “comfort trap,” in which they rely on just one or two marketing mediums to bring in all of their sales.  Testing different avenues could lead to a new marketing medium that yields major returns for your company, but you’ll never know if you don’t try something new.

About the Author:

Brian Morris serves in various capacities as a freelance writer, content developer and public relations specialist for growing small businesses. His previous roles included managing editor for a hometown newspaper and club bartender for a group of quasi-alcoholics. When he’s not writing, he’s usually counting lost follicles and wondering what he ever did with his time before his two children were born.

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