What Am I Paying For When It Comes to Professional Logo Design?

The cost of a professional logo design can vary based on multiple factors, including (but not limited to) how simple or complex the design is, how many colors are used, and who creates the design. Usually, a logo designer has his or her own pricing models, but there are basic standards that most adhere to.

In general, the amount you pay for your logo design should correspond with how much work was put into it and by how many people. Single designers have prices that are subjective, so you should always ask for a detailed list of all the hours and specific work that went into creating your design. The same is true if you decide to work with a company that uses multiple logo designers.

If you are looking to create a simple, minimal logo design that includes your company’s name, a distinctive mark and minimal colors, you may pay somewhere around $200. For this price, you should receive a product that is unique, clear and that highlights your company’s name. Further, you should experience quick turnaround (around 24 hours) for simple work. On the other hand, a more complex design with more involved patterns and less generic lettering could run the bill up to around $400.

What should you expect of the logo designer who you choose to hire to create your simple design? He or she should be flexible, willing to meet your needs and adhere to your company’s requirements, and be willing to work with you throughout the design process. Remember, these designers are artists; however, that does not mean that they know exactly what you want. Your designer should be willing to create around four concepts for you to choose from, and provide at least two rounds of changes should you not approve of the design he or she comes up with.

If you are paying for a more complex logo design with intricate details and diverse fonts, your designer or designers should be willing to create around 10 concepts for you to choose from, as well as provide unlimited changes if you are not satisfied with what he or she comes up with. Further, your designers should offer to provide you with swag that has your newly created logo on it, including envelopes, business cards, stationery and letterheads.

One way to ensure that your logo design is fairly priced and well made is to go with a logo design company rather than an individual designer. First, you can likely gauge the experience and work ethic of the company as a whole by reading reviews or speaking with multiple representatives on the phone. Accountability can be very important for some, and working with a company allows you as the customer to emphasize it. Some of the perks of doing so include access to a team of designers who can collaborate (rather than just one designer) on your logo design and getting more for your money. Since multiple designers are focusing on your logo, you will likely end up with a sophisticated, creative design whether it is simple or complex.

Whether you choose to go with a simple logo design or a more complex one, whether you decide to hire a single logo designer or a logo design company, you should expect to pay between $200-$400 for a logo and are entitled to being provided with at least four different concepts and two design changes. Don’t settle for any less!

This is a guest blog post by , founder of LogoMojo.com. He has helped develop and launch more than 45,000 brands worldwide with clients ranging from small home businesses to Hollywood celebrities.

  • http://about.me/PhilTretheway Phil

    This post is incorrect, misleading and offensive to all professional designers, it should be removed immediately. I understand there’s a market for $200-400 logos, but it’s the absolute bottom of the market. You get what you pay for.

  • http://www.kirschnercaroff.com Lon

    I have to agree with Phil. What type of company could exist having you deal with a team of designers for $200-400? How good could these “designers” be? The idea that a large company is better than a single talented designer is also off the mark. I suppose the late great Paul Rand would not be worth contacting due to the fact that he worked alone.

    Great logos are designed by great designers. They are not bought like eggs off of a shelf.

    Please rethink this post.